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Frequently Asked Questions

About KTExchange.org
Why has KTExchange.org been developed?

Who runs this site?
What is Research Into Action?
How do I use this site?
How do I create an account?
How do I connect with other users?
How do I post a citation?
What keywords should I use to search the literature database?
How do I post an event?
How do I delete my account?
Who do I contact with questions about my account?

 


About knowledge translation and related issues

What is knowledge translation?
How does knowledge translation relate to my work?
What’s the difference between knowledge translation and knowledge transfer?

What is evidence mapping?


 


Why has KTExchange.org been developed?
International surveys conducted by Research Into Action – A Knowledge Translation Initiative, based in the Institute for Health Policy at The University of Texas School of Public Health, indicated that many professionals in government, non-profit institutions, academics, and marketing were interested in having a central source of information and network-building for knowledge translation. KTExchange.org is our response to that expressed interest. Users can access social networking tools to network with colleagues around the world, a literature database, a funding database, an international calendar of events, and a number of other informative tools.

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Who runs this site?
KTExchange.org was created and is managed by Research Into Action – A Knowledge Translation Initiative.

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What is Research Into Action?
Research Into Action – A Knowledge Translation Initiative (RIA) is a grant-funded research project housed at The University of Texas School of Public Health. Our primary mission is to translate public health research into evidence-based policies and programs to enhance the health of communities. Using a new model of knowledge translation developed by the staff, RIA is dedicated to sharing information and best practices to advance the field of KT.

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How do I use this site?
The best way to use KTExchange.org is to become a registered user. Registered users have access to a wide variety of tools and services. These include some advanced social networking tools, a literature database, a funding database, a calendar of events, an RSS feed, e-mail notices, and much more.

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How do I create an account?
On the KTExchange.org home page, go to the MyPortal signup link in the right-hand column. Clicking on “Create an account” will take you to the signup page. On the signup page, enter your first name, last name, a valid e-mail address, create a personal password, and create a display name for use on the Web site. Your e-mail address is used when you first sign up to validate your account. After your account is created, your e-mail address becomes your sign-in.

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How do I connect with other users?
Only registered users may search for and connect with other users of KTExchange.org. When you sign in, you are first taken to the MyPortal dashboard, which controls all the activities available to a registered user. In the left-hand column, under “Actions,” click on “Search for Colleagues.” This will take you to the people search page, where you can search by name, organization, occupation, or location. Click on one of the search results to learn more about that person; if you would like to invite someone to become a colleague, click on the “Invite” button at the bottom of their profile window. They will be notified by e-mail of your invitation.

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How do I post a citation?
Only registered users may post and comment on literature citations. From the MyPortal dashboard, go to “Actions” in the left-hand column. Click on “Post Citations,” which will take you to the “Post Citations” window. Select the type of citation, then fill in as much information as you have available about the citation. KTExchange.org staff will review and verify your citation before it is posted to the literature citation database.

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What keywords should I use to search the literature database?
Only registered users may search the literature database. The following suggested keywords will generate useful articles from our database: knowledge translation, dissemination, public health, nursing, case study, theory, model, definition, strategy, best practice, knowledge management, research utilization, implementation, innovation, and use or user.

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How do I post an event?
Only registered users may post events to the KT events calendar. From the MyPortal dashboard, you may either click on the “Post Events” link under “Actions” in the left-hand column, or on the “Post Events” link immediately under the calendar in the right-hand column. You will be taken to the “Post Events” window. Fill in as much information as you have available about the event, then click “Submit.” KTExchange.org staff will review and verify your citation before it is posted to the events calendar.

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How do I deactivate my account?
Contact the Webmaster at Researchintoaction (at) UTH (dot) TMC (dot) EDU and request that your account be deactivated. Please include your real name and display name in your request.

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Who do I contact with questions about my account?
You can contact the Webmaster at the following e-mail address: Researchintoaction (at) UTH (dot) TMC (dot) EDU

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What is knowledge translation
?
Knowledge translation (KT) is an umbrella term used to describe a variety of activities involved in moving research from the laboratory and the academic journal into the real world where it can be used in practical applications. The most commonly used definition was developed by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR): “KT is defined as a dynamic and iterative process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange and ethically sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products and strengthen the health care system.”


Another commonly used definition was developed by the National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research (NCDDR): “The collaborative and systematic review, assessment, identification, aggregation, and practical application of high-quality disability and rehabilitation research by key stakeholders (i.e., consumers, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers) for the purpose of improving the lives of individuals with disabilities.”

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How does knowledge translation relate to my work?
If you work in pure research; any of the health professions including medicine, nursing, and public health; health communication; or any communication-related profession (e.g., advertising, social marketing, public relations, media relations) with healthcare clients, then part of your work involves knowledge translation.

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What’s the difference between knowledge translation and knowledge transfer?
Several terms, including knowledge translation, knowledge transfer, bench-to-bedside, and knowledge dissemination, among others, have been used somewhat interchangeably. As the healthcare professions have focused more on evidence-based practice, some terms have begun to clarify. Knowledge transfer, as distinct from knowledge translation, has come to mean working agreements between research institutions and commercial companies to develop technology, clinical research results, pharmaceuticals, and the like into marketable products. 

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What is evidence mapping?
Evidence mapping is a way of creating a broad overview of all the research related to a particular topic. As distinct from a systematic review, which zeroes in on very specific questions, evidence mapping is a process in which designated characteristics of multiple research studies are documented, grouped, and displayed according to a conceptual framework. 


An evidence map is one way to visually represent clusters of evidence for summarizing or synthesizing research findings. These diagrams can be used to show related concepts, similarities or differences in study populations or settings, report on the quality and quantity of evidence, and inform evidence-based recommendations.
(With thanks to www.evidencemap.org
)

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